Welcome to Word Soup Wednesday! While the television present The Soup brings you “the stselection, obscure and entirely unbelievable moments in pop society, celebrity news and also truth TV,” Word Soup brings you those starray, obscure, unbelievable (and sometimes NSFW) words from talk shows, sitcoms, dramas, and also simply about anything else on TV.

You are watching: Take it on the arches

bug

Corcoran: “My leg’s been bugging me.”

“La Tempete,” Copper, September 16, 2012

Anachronism alert! While Copper takes location in 1864, bug interpretation “to annoy, pester” originated in 1949, claims the Online Etymology Dictionary. For more Copper anachronisms see Prochronisms.

bully pulpit

Nucky : “My name is on that hospital, and also it’s not to administer you via a bully pulpit.”

“Resolution,” Boardwalk Empire, September 16, 2012

A bully pulpit is “an helpful place, as for making one’s views well-known or rallying assistance,” and also was coined by President Teddy Roosevelt in 1904. (This episode takes area in the 1920s.) More words coined by U.S. poccupants.

keen

Eli : “Happy two birthdays ago.”Will: “Pretty keen.”

“Spaghetti & Coffee,” Boardwalk Empire, September 23, 2012

Keen in this conmessage implies “great; splendid; fine,” and originated in the at an early stage 1900s.

mad as a hatter

Cullen : “Sober as a judge, mad as a hatter.”

“Purged Amethod With Blood,” Hell on Wheels, September 16, 2012

Mad as a hatter indicates “demented or crazy,” and also originated around 1829, claims the Online Etymology Dictionary, “supposedly from erratic behavior resulted in by prolonged expocertain to poison mercuric nitprice, offered in making felt hats.”

Mad as March hare is attested from the 1520s, using the “idea of breeding seachild.” Alice’s Adendeavors in Wonderland through its Mad Hatter hare was publiburned in 1865, the same year this episode takes area.

moochacracy

Jon Stewart: “Or the significant tax breaks the government offers the investor course, whose money is taxed at a resources gains rate of 15% as opposed to simple having-a-project earnings which deserve to be taxed as much as 35%. Boy I wish we had a poster boy for that aspect of moochacracy. Oh right.”

The Daily Sjust how via Jon Stewart, September 19, 2012

Moochacracy is a blfinish of mooch, “to get or try to get somepoint complimentary of charge; sponge,” and also –cracy, “preeminence or government by.” Mooch most likely comes from the Old French muchier, “to hide, skulk,” while –cracy originates from the Greek kratos, “toughness.” Stewart continues:

In 2010, Governor Romney had an changed gross earnings of $21.6 million yet passist just $3 million in federal earnings taxation, or 13.9%. Without the preferential investor taxes code, Romney would have phelp $7.56 million – a federal government subsidy of $4.56 million, or. . . .enough food stamps to feed Mr. Romney through the year 4870.

reboot

Diane Sawyer: “The Romney camp is said to be engineering a reboot.”

The Daily Sexactly how with Jon Stewart, September 18, 2012

Reboot indicates “to rotate (a computer system or operating system) off and also then on again; restart,” and originated in 1971, states the Oxford English Thesaurus (OED). The noun develop originated in 1980.

redistribution

Stephen Colbert: “ dropped the R-bomb! Redistribution, which is simply intricate talk for ‘a black guy is coming for your stuff’! Here’s his vision for America, folks. You pay taxes into a solitary federal firm that pools it and redistributes it throughout the country to construct roads and also bridges, sometimes in claims you don’t live in!”

The Colbert Report, September 19, 2012

Redistribution is “an financial concept or plan that advocates reducing inecharacteristics in the circulation of wealth,” and also originated around 1825, says the OED.

steamy

Eva: “You look steamy, Kevin. Can’t wait to pull those clothes off you later.”

“La Tempete,” Copper, September 16, 2012

Another anachronism. Steamy interpretation “erotic” didn’t come around until 1952, almost 90 years after this episode takes area. Aobtain, for even more Copper anachronisms view Prochronisms.

See more: " I Put A Spell On You Fallout New Vegas Guide, I Put A Spell On You

take it on the arches

Woguy : “Take it on the arches!”

“Resolution,” Boardwalk Empire, September 16, 2012

Take it on the arches is “encouragement for one to relocate along and walk away using one’s foot arches.”

welfare queen

Jon Stewart: “That states nopoint around the real parasites, welfare queens. Public assistance is clearly a course to dependency. I would prefer to see proof otherwise.”Video of Mitt Romney’s mother speaking of Romney’s father: “He was a refugee from Mexico. He was on relief-welfare for the initially years of his life.”

The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, September 18, 2012

Welfare queen is “a pejorative expression offered. . .to define human being who are accsupplied of collecting extreme welfare payments through fraud or manipulation.” The term seems to have actually initially appeared in a 1976 speech by then presidential hopeful Ronald Reagan.

That’s it for this week! Remember, if you view any Word Soup-worthy words, let us understand on Twitter with the hashtag #wordsoup. Your word and Twitter take care of could appear best here!


This entry was posted in national politics, TV, Word Soup and tagged anachronisms, boardwalk empire, colbert report, copper, everyday display, hell on wheels, jon stewart, mitt romney, stephen colbert. Booknote the permaattach.Message navigation
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