James While John Had Had Had Had Had Had Had Had Had Had Had A Better Effect On The Teacher

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How “James while John had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher” is Correct Sentence?

Can anyone explain?

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Not without quotes and punctuation:

James, while John had had “had,” had had “had had;” “had had” had had a better effect on the teacher.

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The context is two students writing a sentence on some graded work, such as:

Bill had the measles.

Bill had had the measles.

When wanting to know why James scored better, the sentence above explains the reason, although I”d probably explain it like this:

James scored better because he used the right verb: had had, instead of just had.

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The sentence is not unlike the famous Buffalo sentence; it”s a contrived example to show how many times a single word can be strung together consecutively in a sentence. Another example is the sign maker who criticizes her own work by saying:

I should have put more space between ham and and and and and eggs.

on a sign that that looks too much like TODAY”S SPECIAL: HAMANDEGGS.

(That ‘that that’ that that last sentence has should just read ‘that.’)

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edited Jun 15 “20 at 7:40

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answered May 19 “13 at 13:23

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J.R.J.R.
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JR is right. It”s the difference between the past simple & the past perfect.Put another way: James, where John had used the past simple, had used the past perfect; the past perfect had gained the teacher”s approval.

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answered May 19 “13 at 13:58

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Paul McCombiePaul McCombie
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To make it grammatically correct, you have to punctuate it correctly: James, where John had had “had”, had had “had had”; “had had” had had a better effect on the teacher.

See more: What Is Address Name When Ordering Online, What Is Address Name

For more information on had had, try What does “had had” mean? How does this differ from “had”? or a grammar book.

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edited Apr 13 “17 at 12:38

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answered May 19 “13 at 13:22
Tim LymingtonTim Lymington
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