In The Name Of Eugenics: Genetics And The Uses Of Human Heredity By Daniel J

Daniel Kevles traces the study and practice of eugenics–the science of “improving” the human species by exploiting theories of heredity–from its inception in the late nineteenth century to its most recent manifestation within the field of genetic engineering. It is rich in narrative, anecdote, attention to human detail, and stories of competition among scientists who have dominated the field.

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Table of Contents

Preface, 1995Preface to the Original EditionI. Francis Galton, Founder of the FaithII. Karl Pearson for Saint BiometrikaIII. Charles Davenport and the Worship of Great ConceptsIV. The Gospel Becomes PopularV. Deterioration and DeficiencyVI. Measures of RegenerationVII. Eugenic EnactmentsVIII. A Coalition of CriticsIX. False BiologyX. Lionel Penrose and the Colchester SurveyXI. A Reform EugenicsXII. Brave New BiologyXIII. The Establishment of Human GeneticsXIV. Apogee of the English SchoolXV. Blood, Big Science, and BiochemistryXVI. Chromosomes-the Binder”s MistakesXVII. A New EugenicsXVIII. Varieties of PresumptuousnessXIX. Songs of DeicideNotesEssay on SourcesAcknowledgementsIndex

What People are Saying About This

Stephen Jay Gould

The finest of all books on the history of eugenics.— Stephen Jay Gould, Harvard University

Editorial Reviews

All the more powerful for confronting folly urbanity and a clear eye.

New Republic – Horace Freeland Judson

The historical sweep that brings to bear in this marvellous book should make us ponder over the tenacity of eugenic theories. What does it say about our thought processes and the social structures that foster them? In addition to a gripping text Kevles provides copious notes and an essay on sources. He weaves personal histories into the history of the field so skillfully, blending anecdote, hard science and—albeit in a restricted sense—sociology, all in the correct proportions, all with enviable style and verve, that it is only after putting the book down that you realize you have been instructed while being entertained.

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Journal of Genetics – Vidyanand Nanjundiah

A lucid and intricate history of eugenics…which has long been the preserve of specialists. Yet an understanding of that history is central to informed debate on issues affecting the public in general and scientists in particular. Kevles”s lively and informative book makes that debate possible. It deserves a wide audience.

Scientific American – Diane B. Paul

A revealing study of the tangled history of the eugenics movement and its relation to the science of human genetics…Kevles makes clear the symbiotic relations between the genuine science of genetics the political programs and prejudices of the eugenicists.

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New York Times Book Review – Leon J. Kamin

The finest of all books on the history of eugenics.

Stephen Jay Gould

The historical sweep that brings to bear in this marvellous book should make us ponder over the tenacity of eugenic theories. What does it say about our thought processes and the social structures that foster them? In addition to a gripping text Kevles provides copious notes and an essay on sources. He weaves personal histories into the history of the field so skillfully, blending anecdote, hard science and—albeit in a restricted sense—sociology, all in the correct proportions, all with enviable style and verve, that it is only after putting the book down that you realize you have been instructed while being entertained.— Vidyanand Nanjundiah

Journal of Genetics

All the more powerful for confronting folly urbanity and a clear eye.— Horace Freeland Judson

New Republic

A lucid and intricate history of eugenics…which has long been the preserve of specialists. Yet an understanding of that history is central to informed debate on issues affecting the public in general and scientists in particular. Kevles”s lively and informative book makes that debate possible. It deserves a wide audience.— Diane B. Paul

Scientific American

A revealing study of the tangled history of the eugenics movement and its relation to the science of human genetics…Kevles makes clear the symbiotic relations between the genuine science of genetics the political programs and prejudices of the eugenicists.— Leon J. Kamin

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