” All The Things You Are Lead Sheet Music, All The Things You Are Sheet Music

All the Things You Are (Jerome Kern) is one of the most commonly played jazz standards and is often one of the first tunes called at a jazz jam session. Because of the tune’s popularity, many guitarists learn to play All The Things You Are at a fairly early stage in their development. What most guitarists fail to realize is that the piece actually has a fairly intricate harmonic structure that can pose quite a few problems for the beginning improviser or comper.

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By understanding the relationship between each section of the tune, and the chords within those sections, you can develop a greater appreciation for the overall formation of the harmony, which will allow you to better navigate the changes in both a solo and chordal fashion.

LESSON CONTENTS

Key Center BreakdownSoloing Tips

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All The Things You Are – Charlie Parker Intro

Charlie Parker – All the Things You Are Transcribed Solo

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All The Things You Are – Key Center Breakdown

All the Things You Are can be divided into four sections, with the first two being sub-sections of one larger section:

A Section

The first section of the tune contains bars 1 to 8 and is labeled A.

A’ Section

This is followed by another eight-bar phrase that we will label A’. The ‘ symbol is used to differentiate this section from the first, as they are both very similar, but as you will see, they are in different keys.

These first two sections can also be thought of as the first “half” of the tune. In classical music, they would be called the exposition.

B Section

The third section contains bars 17 to 24 and will be labeled B. The B section is the “contrasting” section as it uses different keys and a different melody line than the other three sections.

In classical music, this section would be called the development section.

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A” Section

The last section of the tune is similar to the first, though just a bit different, so we will label it A’’.

This section is used to “wrap” up the first two sections by restating the melody line in bars 25 through 29, before presenting new material that leads to the final cadence in bars thirty-three through thirty-five. In classical music, this section would be called the recapitulation.

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A Section – Bars 1 to 8

There are two key centers found within the first eight bars of the tune, Ab and C:

There are two key centers found within the first eight bars of the tune, Ab and C:

The first five bars contains a 6-2-5-1-4 progression in the key of Ab.This is followed by a 2-5-1 progression in the key of C.

Even though these chords are in two different keys, the fact that they are a half-step apart makes for a smooth modulation.

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A’ Section – Bars 9 to 16

The next eight bars have a similar key structure as the first eight, though this time the two keys being used are Eb and G:

The first five bars of this section is a 6-2-5-1-4 progression in the key of Eb.This is followed by a 2-5-1 progression in the key of G to finish the section. This is the same chord progression we saw in the first eight bars, only now it has been transposed down by the interval of a perfect fourth.

Thinking of the second eight bars as a transposed version of the first eight will allow you to develop motivic ideas over the first half of the tune. Anything you play over the first eight bars can be played over the second eight bars, just a fourth lower, or a fifth higher depending on how you want to think about it.

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See the examples below for a sample of how this could be done. Notice how the fingering and the intervals are the same between the two lines, the second motive has just been moved up the neck to fit the new key center.

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